Morvah Church, Watch Croft and the cliffs. A short walk.

While the majesty of a cathedral such as St Pauls is impressive, I’m more likely to be moved by simplicity. When I parked up in Morvah for today’s walk I started by popping into its beautiful and plain and rugged church. A church was first dedicated here way back in 1400, although the tower is the only remaining part of the medieval building.

Morvah Church

Morvah Church

Inside, I sat awhile in the shafts of sunlight, it was utterly peaceful within, and somehow made even more charming with the mooing of the cows outside.

Plain, simple, beautiful.

Plain, simple, beautiful.

The walk starts just behind the church on the footpath down to the main coast path, and I then headed east to Carn Fran Kas where the mine remains include the walls of what must have been a very large mine building. I headed inland again from the carn along a marshy path (Morvah means marsh and it’s appropriate for this path) where the hedgerow towered 15 feet high before coming out onto the B3306 coast road at Trevowhan at the stone stack.

Crossing the main road we headed up hill passing Trevean and looking for the path to Watch Croft further up.

The view form Watch Croft

The view form Watch Croft

There’s an early path that joins the track to Watch Croft but it’s worth going another hundred yards to take the more obvious gravelled track on the left. On another day – take a right here instead and you’ll come to Chun Castle.

The walk across the top of Watch Croft is a wonderful thing on a clear day, and today, though truly autumnal for the first time this year, was crystal clear and I could see for miles, taking in Morvah, Pendeen and down to Pendeen Watch.

This view is the daily sight for the lucky people who live in the lonely house high on the croft. I can’t imagine they’d ever tire of it.

Imagine having this view greet you daily.

Imagine having this view greet you daily.

There are the usual signs warning of mine shafts, and here there really are open shafts with little protection around them. Who can resist throwing a boulder in? Not me. It crashed against the sides for a long way on its drop. The wind howling up the shaft suggested it comes out on the cliffs, though I’m not sure if that’s the case.

Serious shaft just beyond this opening!

Serious shaft just beyond this opening!

The descent is easy, but pause frequently – the view of the coast is excellent from here.

Cross the B3306 again, turning right along the road for just a few steps before the path continues through a gate with a lovely clasp which I should have photographed.

A gate. The sea.

A gate. The sea.

This path takes you back down to the main cliff path, this time take a left and watch out for the boggy bits as you make your way back to the Morvah branch, and then back up to the church.

High expectations of pony intelligence and dexterity.

High expectations of pony intelligence and dexterity.

Including taking a few photos this took an hour and three quarters.

Cliffs on the return towards Morvah

Cliffs on the return towards Morvah

Heading back to St Just I stopped off at the Yew Tree Gallery to see the Autumn Feast exhibition there that includes work by Emily Sutton, Tessa Newcomb and Marks Royle and Hearld.

What's this sweet little flower? Anyone know?

What’s this sweet little flower? Anyone know?

 

As I was leaving I commented on the grapes in the green house and was given a bunch by Gilly. After trying one I had to avoid them until I’d taken this photo, after which I ate the lot. They’re delicious, sweet and juicy Muscat grapes, unlike anything from the supermarket, and grown in a Cornish garden.

Exhibition, and locally grown grapes.

Exhibition, and locally grown grapes.

I said today was the first that felt like autumn, it certainly did, but that’s no bad thing. The clear fresh air felt great, even to one used to his daily dose of clean sea breeze.

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